• Volume 1 Number 12 - December 2006

    Features

    When Duke Energy moves water at Lake Keowee during winter, it turns on the spots.

    The water needs to move.

    It doesn’t matter which way, as long as there’s a strong current carrying it in one direction or the other, and it doesn’t hurt if there’s a nice breeze blowing, even one hard enough to dot the surface of Lake Keowee with whitecaps.

    The biggest shad in the South swim in the Cooper River and offer a surprising holiday treat for S.C. anglers.

    They’re known as “Christmas shad” because American shad, starting their annual migratory spawning run, can be caught at the lower Cooper River during Christmas week.

    Where should December crappie anglers go when the target covers 60,000 acres? Find out what Lake Murray pros do.

    Lake Murray is, by all estimates, a big reservoir.

    It stretches more than 41 miles from the dam near Columbia past the forks of the Big Saluda and Little Saluda rivers, covers 50,000 acres and has 520 miles of shoreline.

    Hard work and patience lets an Easley 10 year-old bag a buck that’s the envy of his deer club.

    Whenever Dillan Decandt visited Tony Cole, he was mesmerized by the mounted deer heads that stared down at him from his uncle’s den wall.

    Wait for bad weather, then put on your walking shoes to find the winter’s best bucks.

    As the words of a timeless song suggest, “Deep in December, it’s nice to remember.”

    December brings spot-tail bass into extremely shallow water and offers anglers a variety of thrilling fishing action.

    Anglers who haven’t sampled the hot redfish action at Charleston during the cold month of December have missed a big part of an excellent fishery.

    Bad weather can stack the deck in favor of deer hunters, but saltwater anglers prefer seasonal weather to stack redfish on flats.