• Volume 2 Number 3 - March 2007

    Features

    With offshore fishing action kicking off, here’s a look at the status of many of the state’s popular gamefish species.

    The Atlantic Ocean is a really big fishing hole.

    Besides the enormity and variety of gamefish populations the Atlantic hosts, the ocean borders several countries, each, no matter how large or small, vying for its fair slice of the pie, plus a few other nations who wet a line in the pond that want to crash the dessert table.

    Santee Cooper is legendary for many things, one being its fabulous largemouth bass fishing. Here’s why the fish are big and a few ways to catch them this spring.

    The 2006 B.A.S.S. Elite Series Santee Cooper Showdown put the exclamation mark behind the fantastic largemouth bass fishing that the lakes support.

    Lake Jocassee has the largest brown and rainbow trout in the Southeast, and anglers say it rivals Canadian lakes.

    The first thing you notice after arriving at Lake Jocassee is that it’s no ordinary southern impoundment.

    The weather is pleasant and you want to go inshore fishing but there’s not a speck of live bait in the creeks. Don’t despair -- thaw out spring red drum with hard baits.

    Standing on the bow of the flats boat, I felt like a ready-made hamburger under the heat lamp after the lunch crowd was long gone.

    You can do the stroll, troll, or dip and catch your limit of fat slabs at Lake Greenwood this spring.

    Surveying the landscape, seeing the boat docks, bridges, river arms, and just the general atmosphere of Lake Greenwood, even a novice angler can tell this is a place to catch fish.

    Calm, early spring mornings offer spectacular topwater seatrout action from the shoreline of Edisto’s creeks.

    One day last year I laid an open box of 17 MirrOLures — no two alike — in front of Ken Lauer and asked him to select one for the trout fishing we were planning the next morning in the Edisto River basin.

    When it comes to tactics to lure reluctant gobblers to spring hunters, nobody does it better than Joe and Rodney Kelly.

    It’s turkey-talking time in the Palmetto State, and hunters are getting ready to hit the woods.