• Volume 2 Number 5 - May 2007

    Features

    Lake Marion contains whopper bluegills and shellcrackers, and there’s never a better time to try for them than May.

    A good bird dog could not have gone on point any better.

    Chuck Porter leaned forward, nose in the air, and turned his head slightly. Then he locked up solid. He slowly stretched out his arm and pointed to a tiny pocket of open water in a small clump of cypress trees about 30 feet in front of us.

    Charleston’s anglers feel guilty because they have so much fun catching sheepsheads in the waters coursing near they city.

    There are lots of fish species to catch in the waters surrounding Charleston. So many in fact, that it’s almost impossible to pick a single fish to target for an outing.

    Two upper coast anglers know where they can get a good reef fish bite this time of year. And spadefish are as much fun to eat as they are to catch.

    Mark Dickson fishes most days — it’s his business, guiding fishermen for some of the Grand Strand’s more popular fishing targets: puppy drum, speckled trout, flounder, Spanish and king mackerel.

    As fickle as hurricanes, cobia frustrate their fair share of saltwater anglers. Here are some top-to-bottom techniques sure to cure the madness.

    Crossing the Broad River at the Highway 170 bridge outside of Beaufort, it looked like the river was supporting an impromptu boat show.

    Food plots often are seen as places to harvest a gobbler. That might be true, but they also play an important role for turkey numbers. Here’s how to make the most of food plots.

    Walking through the hurricane-ravaged Francis Marion National Forest, the logging road provided the only clear path illuminated by an April full moon.

    The Congaree River had the first land-locked striped bass in the U.S., but now a variety of factors threaten their survival.

    History doesn’t record the name of the first angler to catch a striped bass from the Santee-Cooper system.

    Anglers don’t have to wait for deep summer to find trophy king mackerels if they know where to go off the Palmetto coast.

    King mackerel anglers don’t have to wait until the mid-summer heat to score on serious fishing at the South Carolina coast.