• Volume 4 Number 7 - July 2009

    Features

    Try these five tricks and fill your stringer with bream every time out.

    Certain fish are usually targeted by a particular group of anglers. It becomes normal for certain people to fish for stripers, catfish or bass.

    Beat the heat by fishing in Clarks Hill’s tailrace for trophy fish.

    When the water at Clarks Hill heats up for the summer, striped bass have two places to hang out where they can survive the heat. Deep water in the lower end offers thermal refuge for the majority of the lake’s striped and hybrid bass. They hold deep near the thermocline where cooler water and higher dissolved-oxygen levels see them through ’til cooler weather arrives.

    Go light or heavy for Mr. Toothy in Beaufort, Hilton Head waters.

    A day-lighter? For many of us, the first one was compliments of Peter Benchley’s movie Jaws. When the music intentionally lulled us into a relaxed state in the middle of that high-tension thriller, then they thrust that great white shark’s opened maw onto the wide screen in full attack mode, fright lifted viewers so far out of their movie seats that you could see “daylight” below.

    Mackerel are prime candidates to help teach Charleston-area fishermen the basics of fly-rodding.

    Spanish mackerel visit South Carolina’s nearshore and inshore waters during the summer, and you can almost “bank” a few each trip in July.

    Wading the Cape Romain flats for summer redfish is a not-to-be-forgotten treat.

    It’s sort of a personal thing.

    It’s a point guard trying to beat his defender off the dribble, a cornerback trying to stay inside the jersey of the wide receiver he’s covering, a hunter in full camo with his back up against an oak tree, trying to lure a lovesick gobbler into shotgun range.